In The News

May is Mom’s Month!

Here at Arborview Family Medicine, we love moms! We have had the privilege of treating multiple generations of moms since 1976. We specialize in treating the entire family and have had the immense honor to help many generations in families, resulting in helping great-grandmother, grandmother, and mother from the same family. Our family approach to medicine allows us a unique understanding of family history and how it impacts health the health of family members. Different diseases strike women at different times in their life, knowing that family history allows us to work with each patient on lowering risks and hopefully preventing the disease altogether. Keep in mind that even if you have a genetic predisposition to any disease from your parents, lifestyle choices and a whole host of other factors ultimately play into developing any illness. So keep records of your mother’s (and father’s) health issues as well as those of other close relatives and be sure that your health care provider is aware of them. As the saying goes, an ounce of prevention can be worth a pound of cure, so eat a balanced diet, exercise and make sure your healthcare professional is in the...
April is National Stress Awareness Month

April is National Stress Awareness Month

Stress has an impact on our health, our mood, and even increase our bad habits. Everyone experiences periods of stress at some time in their lives. There are several types of stress, a life-changing event such as a death in the family, loss of job, or divorce places us more at risk for the unpleasant outcome of too much stress. However, smaller, short term events like a traffic jam or getting an awful haircut, these passing events may also cause have some unwelcomed consequences. While no one can avoid stress entirely, there are ways to manage it and minimize its impact on our health. 1. Take a time out! Experts tell us that removing ourselves from the stress trigger, if even for only a few minutes, can keep us from reacting poorly and creating additional stress. Whether it is a crying baby, or demanding boss, counting to ten and taking a few deep breaths can put a whole new spin on the situation. 2. Exercise! You don’t have to run an hour on the treadmill or bench press three hundred pounds to enjoy the benefits of exercise. Just walking a mile or spending thirty minutes on the bike may do the trick, the important thing is engaging in exercise regularly. This can help lower blood pressure, cure insomnia and elevate your mood due to the release of endorphins. 3. Follow a healthy diet! While stress makes most people want to eat more, be sure to choose what you eat wisely, fruits and vegetables are a superior choice to a half a gallon of ice cream! Choosing wisely will also...
March is Multiple Sclerosis Month

March is Multiple Sclerosis Month

March is Multiple Sclerosis Month, declared so by New Jersey Governor Christie in 2015. Multiple Sclerosis is a disease of the central nervous system and can have a devastating impact on the daily lives of sufferers, including causing blindness, acute pain, difficulty processing information, problems with balance and coordination, sometimes even paralysis and overwhelming fatique. This happens, as the myelin, or protective covering, which surrounds the nerves, is damaged and eventually destroyed, causing reduced communication between the brain and nerve pathways. MS can occur at any age, but most are diagnosed between the ages of twenty and fifty, but there are reported cases as young as two and as old as seventy-five. It is estimated that over two million people world wide have MS, with more than two to three times being women over men. While there is no cure at the moment for MS, the disease is not fatal either, with experts currently estimating that those with MS will live seven years less than their healthy counterparts. While there are no specific risk factors studies, have shown that those deficient in vitamin D and those who smoke cigarettes are at a higher risk. Diagnosis is sometimes difficult as symptoms of the disease often come and go. Making it difficult for doctors to access in the early stages. There are no specific laboratory tests to make a definitive diagnosis. However, MRI’s are being used more successfully to arrive at a diagnosis. While there is not a cure, there are medications that can help most people live a productive life, and new medications and findings are on the horizon providing...

National Heart Health Month

February is the month of love, and we are celebrating by showing our hearts some love. It makes perfect sense that February is National Heart Month; a month dedicated to promoting awareness about heart disease and its prevalence. Heart disease affects millions of American’s every year and is the leading cause of death among men and women. Did you know that heart disease is responsible for the death of more people than all types of cancer combined? Defeating this killer depends on getting the word out, and spreading awareness as the first step in helping individual’s lead healthy lives and form heart-healthy habits. Fortunately, there are ways to help reduce your risk of heart disease. First of all, being physically active can dramatically reduce your risk of heart conditions. The American Heart Association suggests about 150 minutes of moderate-intensity physical activity per week. Maintaining a balanced diet with plenty of whole grains, fruits, vegetables, and choosing lean meats can also help decrease your risk. It is important to clear any new exercise routines or diets with your health care professional before starting. Stress can also play a major role in heart health. Although some stress is inevitable, managing your stress levels can help lower blood pressure and damage to the heart. It is also imperative to know your risk. If you are related to someone with a history of heart disease, your risk increases. If you know your family history, you can take action to decrease your risk by visiting a specialist early on. Help promote healthy hearts by spreading the word about American Heart Month this February and...

Tips To Reduce Stress This Holiday

Although it’s said to be the most wonderful time of the year, the holiday season may not feel that way to everyone. A survey completed by NBC found that 45% of Americans would prefer to skip the holidays completely. There are several reasons why people may feel more stressed during this season. The pressure of holiday shopping and increased spending, preparation for travel, or attending holiday festivities may all be factors that escalate stress levels. It’s no secret that stress takes a toll on our bodies. It’s known to cause headaches, stomach pain, sleep issues, increase blood pressure and eventually lead to heart and vascular problems. Stress can also suppress your immune system making you more vulnerable to viruses and more difficult to fight infections. This is why it is very important to monitor and reduce stress during the holidays. First of all, be aware of your stress. By knowing what causes it, you can plan ahead to prevent or reduce it. It’s essential that you remember to take time for yourself during the hustle and bustle. Eating healthy, exercising, and drinking water will help you feel better and relaxed during the holidays. Lastly, don’t forget to breathe. Researchers have found that by being still and focusing on your breath for one minute per day can help reduce stress and negative effects that it has on the body. Most importantly, if you do feel ill or under the weather during the holiday hustle and bustle, do not put off seeing your medical provider. Delaying diagnoses and treatment will only add to any issues at hand, your health comes first,...

September is Healthy Aging Month

Looking at the average life span of someone born in 1950 and of someone born today you may see some drastic differences. In 1950, someone born in the United States had an average life expectancy of 68 years. Today the average life expectancy is over 84 years. Due to our advances in health care and technology, you can expect to live a lot longer than those in the 1950’s.  Living longer means that the average citizen over the age of 65 will have at least one chronic medical condition. With the cost of daily living continuing to rise and insurance companies straining to provide coverage for everyone, this longer life expectancy can be some of the most expensive years of your life. To prevent costly medical expenses and chronic illness that impact your quality of life, it is imperative that you commit to a healthy lifestyle. There is no reason that your golden years can’t be the best years of your life, in fact pollsters reported younger generations are feeling more stressed than their older counterparts. Follow our Facebook page this month as we celebrate September’s National Healthy Aging Month by sharing tips on how you can prepare for your later years or improve life in the golden years now! There is no time like the present to make your life the best it can...